Reporting accessibility findings

The breadth and flexibility of accessibility analysis opportunities are both an opportunity and a threat. Providing useful, relevant indicators and results is a powerful way to support the delivery of improvements and working partnerships. However, it is very easy to output vast quantities of data which can cause more confusion than benefit.

The user interface therefore needs to help define what information about accessibility, or the potential to change accessibility, will be most useful. The design of the interface should be informed by policy requirements but is likely to include at least the following capabilities:

Community or social outcomes

·         The choice of opportunities available for shopping

·         The travel time and cost to the nearest opportunity

·         Information about the catchment population able to access shops, health centres and other local facilities using active travel modes

·         The catchment population able to access shops, health centres and other local facilities using non-car modes including public transport.

Comparative measures

·         The ratio of travel times by different modes to assess the potential for modal shift

·         Accessibility for low-mobility groups compared with higher-mobility groups, eg non-car/car, mobility impaired/fully mobile.

Stated perceptions

·         Perceived barriers to reaching neighbourhood services

·         Cultural factors affecting travel choices, eg car dependence

·         Levels of knowledge of travel choices available.